Tasha D. Dyson


Tasha DysonSecurity Analyst / Investigator
Protus3 since 2000

Education and Experience: Bachelor of Arts degree in English, with Honors, University of Florida. Continuing education credits in web development tools, web graphics, and AutoCAD.
Personal Interests: Performing with The Encore Singers, creating art from found and recycled objects, volunteering with Activate Good at Wake Relief, cooking, and learning something new.
Certifications: Licensed Private Investigator in North Carolina.
Affiliations: Member of Phi Beta Kappa.

What are some notable or memorable projects?
I was part of the system design team for two projects at RMA as a subcontractor to O’Brien/Atkins: the North Carolina National Guard Headquarters and State of North Carolina Emergency Operations Center, and the New State Laboratory for Public Health and Medical Examiners Office. Both facilities were constructed near our office, and it was exciting to see a two-dimensional drawing become a three-dimensional building. The other memorable project is an embezzlement investigation where the suspect pled guilty and paid restitution to our client. The challenge of that case was to try to take a complex financial situation, compare it to the company standard and normal practice, and make the results as clear and simple as possible to illustrate the theft.

What do you enjoy most about your role in security?
Part of my job includes proofreading and editing most of the documents produced by RMA, including marketing materials, investigative reports, vulnerability assessments, training programs, and drawing and specification packages for system design projects. Because of this, I get to be a small part of almost every project and can help transfer information learned from one client and project to other work. I also enjoy being a part of a process that identifies problems and then works to “fix” them.

What is your greatest security concern?
In this age of information, I’m concerned about the restrictions placed on employers and background investigation companies when it comes to the use of personal information. In previous decades, when an employer was faced with a hiring decision, they had a good idea about who their applicants were. The world was smaller. They may have known the applicant’s family, friends, or neighbors, and the applicant often came with recommendations from current employees. This is no longer the case. People move frequently, and it is no longer likely that employers know anything about an applicant beyond what is provided on a resume and during an interview. We’re all aware that social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have replaced the corner store, social club, and local hangout of yesterday. People post their behavior, opinions, and attitudes freely. Why do some employers feel restricted concerning the use of this public information?

Tasha Dyson vCard